28

The Prospect Awareness Pyramid

Do you know the awareness levels of your prospects? Are they just orientating – or ready to buy?

Before you can sell your product to anyone, your prospects need to know:

1) that they are experiencing a problem;
2) that there is a solution;
3) and that you are offering the product that solves their problem.

You do this by raising their awareness with content, customised pricing and tailor-made product offerings. But how?

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Conversion tip from:

Nico Oud

Nico Oud

Marketing and business coach

25

Keep Your Confirmation Bias Under Control

“I know this’ll work because I made it!” Let’s not forget what’s arguably the most dangerous one: the confirmation bias.

This one is quite simple: you are typically more likely to like your own design. After all, you put a lot of work in it, it’s your vision, it’s very possible you may be a bit biased towards it. That may cause you to not look at it with a clear vision.

This doesn’t have to be just because you like your design either. Designing takes a lot of time. Simply looking at your design for so long can cause you to miss small mistakes, which could end up costing you a lot of conversions. Always keep an open mind and ask feedback from other designers.

confirmation bias

Conversion tip from:

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda

Conversion specialist

21

Emphasize the Pain Your Customers Have, Before Presenting Your Solution

If you are solving a problem of your customers, such as back pain, it’s sometimes very effective to emphasize the pain – before presenting your solution. 

So, how does it work?  

You begin by stating the pain on your page “Do you have back pain? Then, before showing the solution, you should stick a knife in their pain, and keep twisting the knife until they scream…. well, figuratively speaking 🙂 

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emphasize pain

Conversion tip from:

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda

Conversion specialist

20

Phrase Your USP’s as Gain or Loss, Depending on the Risk

People are risk-averse when they have something to gain. When people have something to lose, they take more risks. People won’t take a lot of risks when they could win $100, but will definitely take more risk when about to lose $100. People are willing to take more risk to minimize the chance of losing it.

This effect is known as the reflection effect and was discovered by Nobel-prize winner Kahneman. When you want customers to make a risk-averse choice (such as buying from you), test by phrasing your USPs as gains. When you want customers to make a risk-seeking choice (such as switching to you), phrase your USPs as losses.

usp as gain or loss depending on risk

Conversion tip from:

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda

Conversion specialist

19

People Are More Afraid Of Losing Than Winning (Loss-Aversion)

The pain of losing is psychologically about twice as powerful as the pleasure of gaining, known as the Loss Aversion principle.

When people win 100k they feel happy, but the emotional pain experienced when losing 100k is much stronger. This technique is widely used in marketing by offering a free trial and eliminating access so it feels like a loss.

On your site, you can apply this principle in many ways. Many sites use it to frame a headline from a loss aversion point of view. Instead of saying “receive weekly updates” you could say “don’t miss any updates”, which implies people will lose something.

loss aversion

Conversion tip from:

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda

Conversion specialist

16

Add User Testimonials

Does your page contain testimonials? What would a landing page be without testimonials?

Visitors won’t trust your product if no one recommends it. You need customer testimonials on your landing page to win their trust. There are many methods to feature testimonials, or customer reviews, on your landing page.

There are a couple of ways to do this. First, you could shows logos of your clients. Another way is showing screenshots of social media responses or Twitter cards. But the plain old customer review quotes works great as well.

user testimonials

Conversion tip from:

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda

Conversion specialist

13

Ask Something Small Before Asking Something Bigger

The foot-in-the-door technique is a widely used method in door-to-door sales. Someone who complies with a small initial request will be more likely to agree to a later, bigger, request. If the request had been asked outright, they would not have agreed. Humans want to stay consistent, so a small yes often leads to a bigger yes.

If you ask someone to bake a cake for you, most people would say no. If you first ask if they know which ingredients you’ll need, they will probably help you. If you ask a few more questions (“WIll you help me buy the ingredients?”) building up to the final question, people are more likely to say yes.

You can apply this principle by changing the order of your form fields. If you are collecting leads for solar panels, ask a few small questions first (roof size, material, e.g.), before asking personal details (bigger request).

consistency principle

Conversion tip from:

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda

Conversion specialist

7

Be Careful When Showing Faces, They Might Be Distracting

Humans can’t resist looking at faces. When we notice a face, we have a tendency to first scan those faces, before looking at anything else. When you show a face on your landing page it will (very likely) be the first thing people (subconsciously) look at.

This principle is called facial-distraction. Faces attract attention instantly, but because of this, they can distract attention from your content and offer. If you do use faces on your pages (that rhymes) apply the gaze cueing effect.

facial distraction

Conversion tip from:

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda

Conversion specialist

2

Ensure Your Landing Page Works on All Devices and Browsers

I know, I know. This tip is an open door. But many people leave this door right open 🙂

How certain are you that your site works well on all popular devices and browsers? The easiest way to get more sales is checking whether your site works well. I’d guess 99% of all sites I’ve optimized have had technical issues in certain devices and browsers. I’ve recovered so much revenue that was lost because someone rushed the QA testing part.

I often use Browserstack for QA testing. Checking it is boring as hell, finding issues sucks. Solving those issues and seeing the extra sales come in is fun.

solve technical conversion issues

Conversion tip from:

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda

Conversion specialist

1

Talk About User Benefits, Not Product Features

On your landing page, try writing everything from your customers’ point of view. Although it might seem counterintuitive, consumers rarely want to buy things for the sake of buying them – they want to solve their problems. Talk about user benefits and not about the features of a product.

If you’re selling umbrellas you could talk about the unique fabric you’re using or the fact it can be used in windy weather. But the real benefit for your customers is that they won’t get wet. Apple did this great when launching the iPod. They didn’t say “1gb of storage” but they said “1000 songs in your pocket”. To turn your features into benefits, ask yourself the question: why does this feature matter?

features versus benefits

Conversion tip from:

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda

Conversion specialist

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So who comes up with these tips, anyway?

Done&Tested shares conversion rate optimization tips with digital marketers, designers and business owners. Each week I add a conversion tip or insight I love, or just blows my mind. All tips are meant as inspiration and I recommend split-testing them because they might not work for your audience. I work as a freelance conversion specialist. Would you like to share a tip as well? Drop me an email here.

Gijs Wierda

Gijs Wierda